September 2019

Jack Daly, TBTI Master’s student, completed his thesis on ‘Impacts of International Trade Policy on Fisheries-Dependent Coastal Communities: A Newfoundland Case Study‘. Jack was studying at Memorial University, under the supervision of Dr. Ratana Chuenpagdee.


Jack’s research looks at fisheries trade through the lens of a bilateral free trade agreement between Canada and the European Union. This research, nested in fishing communities in the Great Northern Peninsula of the island of Newfoundland, examines how people in fishing communities perceive trade and ultimately how trade policy impacts them.

The Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is an international agreement that works to further integrate the economies of Canada and the European Union in both goods and services. CETA brings with it significant changes in seafood trade policy, with 100% of EU tariffs on fish and seafood products eliminated within seven years of its signing along with domestic policy changes for the province. Policy implications of CETA include changes to government investment in the fishery and domestic processor protections, both of which elicit disagreements at the regional and provincial level.

Given the disagreements over the impacts of CETA, Jack Daly’s research is highly relevant to contextualize CETA in the province and more specifically in the Great Northern Peninsula. In his thesis, Daly discusses his analysis of the finalized trade agreement, as well as community and government responses to CETA.


Read more on Jack Daly’s research:

TBTI Masters’ student Jack Daly reflects on his participation at 2019 MARE conference

Notes from the field: Effects of global trade on sustainable fisheries and coastal community viability in the Great Northern Peninsula, Canada

What impact might international trade agreements have at the local level? The example of CETA and its implications for Newfoundland and Labrador’s fisheries.

Impacts of CETA on Sustainability of Northern Tip Coastal Communities


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *